Randolph’s House of Truax – Second Generation (Sara, Susanna, Rachel)

Part I – House of Truax – Etymology
Part II – House of Truax – Historical
Part III – House of Truax – Church records
Part IV – House of Truax – New Amsterdam records
Part V – House of Truax – First Generation
Part VI – House of Truax – Truax Genealogy (Land Records)
Part VI – House of Truax – “First” Generation – Maria
Part VII – House of Truax – Second Generation (Philip, Rachel, Sara)
Part VIII – House of Truax – Second Generation (Susanna, Rebecca, Abraham)
Part IX – Randolph’s House of Truax – Introduction
Part X – Randolph’s House of Truax – First Generation
Part XI – Randolph’s House of Truax – Second Generation (Philippe, Maria)
Part XII – Randolph’s House of Truax – Second Generation (Sara, Susanna, Rachel) – below

Tonight is ladies’ night, as we hit three more of Philippe’s daughters. Next up are Abraham and Rebecca. Then we make some corrections before resuming. In the meantime, please witness Sara, Susanna, and Rachel, as contrasts to Maria. Then, I have not much of the manuscript remaining, but for miscellaneous notes – but interesting ones.

Randolph’s House of Truax – Second Generation – Sara, Susanna, Rachel

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  1. Sara2 du Trieux, born in New Netherlands, as distinctly stated in her marriage banns. These banns were published on June 9, 1641, to “Isaacq de Foreest, j. m. Van Leyden”. Isaac de Forest was baptized at Leyden, Holland, July 10, 1616, and was a son of Jesse de Forest. The probable friendship of these two families in Holland has already been discussed. Isaac de Forest had immigrated with his brother Hendrick and his sister Rachel in the Rensselaerswyck, which sailed from Amsterdam on Sept. 25, 1636, and arrived at New Amsterdam March 5, 1637, after many delays. This family has been so fully written in “A Walloon Family in America” that it is only necessary to give an outline of it here. It would seem that Isaac de Forest had been a staunch friend of Maria Peeck through all her many vicissitudes. He was one of the witnesses at the baptism of her illegitimate child in 1640, a year before his marriage to her sister. He was the guardian of her minor children on her second marriage, and she constantly went to him for aid. He died in 1674. His widow, Sara du Trieux, or Sara Philips, as she was sometimes called, died on November 9, 1692.

Children: 14 (de Forest), 11 sons and 3 daughters, all baptised at New Amsterdam:-

  1. i. Jessen3, bap. Nov. 9, 1642. Named for his grandfather, Jesse de Forest. Died in infancy.
  2. ii. Susanna3, bap. Jan. 22, 1645; marriage banns to Pieter de Riemer, widower, Jan. 3, 1665.
  3. iii. Gerrit3, bap. May 21, 1646; died in infancy.
  4. iv. Gerrit3, bap. June 10, 1647; no further record.
  5. v. Marie3, bap. Jan. 10, 1649; died young.
  6. vi. Michael3, twin to Marie, bap. Jan. 10, 1649; died young.
  7. vii. Jan3, bap. March 27, 1650; marriage banns to Susannah, daughter of Nicholas Verlet, June 8, 1673.
  8. viii. Philip3, bap. July 28, 1652; married Tryntje, daughter of Hendrick Kip, Jan. 5, 1676.
  9. ix. Isaac3, bap. April 25, 1655; married Sept. 4, 1681 Lysbeth, daughter of Lawrence Van der Spiegel.

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  1. x. Hendrick3, bap. Sept. 9, 1657; marriage banns July 5, 1682, to Femmetje, daughter of Barent Van Flaesbeek.
  2. xi. David3, bap. Aug. 1, 1660; died in infancy.
  3. xii. David3, bap. Dec. 19, 1663; died in infancy.
  4. xiii. Maria3, bap. July 7, 1666; married first June 15, 1687, Bernard Darby of London; married second, 1706, Isaac, son of Peter de Riemer (her sister’s husband – a son by his first wife).
  5. xiv. David3, bap. Sept. 7. 1669; married about 1696, Martha Blagge.
  1. Susanna2 du Trieux, born in New Netherlands; marriage banns July 31, 1644, to Evert Jansen Wendel. Evert Jansen Wendel was born in Embden, Friesland, in 1615. He came to New Amsterdam in 1640 in the service of the Dutch West India Company. About 1651 he removed to Fort Orange, and became prominent there. He was an elder of the Dutch church there in 1656; was appointed orphan-master in 1657; and was magistrate in 1660 and 1661. His wife died about 1660, and in 1663 he married second Maritje Abrahamse, widow of Thomas Janse Mingael, and daughter of Abraham Pieter Vosburgh, by whom he had four children. He married third Ariantje ___. He died in 1709, aged 94, and was buried under the old church then standing at the corner of Yonker and Handelaer Streets ,the present State Street and Broadway, in Albany. His will, dated June 30, 1663, speaks of his late wife Susanna de Truwe, and mentions his children Elsie, aged 16; Johannes, 14; Diewer, 10; Jeronimus, 8; Philip, 5; and Evert, 3.

Children:- 8 (Wendel), 5 sons and 3 daughters. The first four were baptised at New Amsterdam, and the last four were born at Fort Orange.

  1. i. Thomas3, bap. Sept. 18, 1645. Name not given in baptismal record, but supplied by Talcott. Died young, as he is not mentioned in his father’s will. Witnesnse: Isaac de Foreest, Tryntje Roelofs.
  2. ii. Elsje3, bap. Jan. 27, 1647. Witnesses: de Hr. Willem Kieft, Gouverneur, Isac de Foreest, Tryntie Roelofs. [Abraham Staats?]
  3. iii. Johannes3, bap. Feb. 2, 1649. Witnesses: Philip du Trieux, Mr. Paulus Van der Beeck, Johannes Rodenburg, Marie en Sara du Trieux.
  4. iv. Dievertje3, bap. Nov. 27, 1650. Witnesses: Susanna Philips (No. 7 of this genealogy). Died in infancy.
  5. v. Dievertje3, born about 1653.
  6. vi. Jeronimus, born about 1655.
  7. vii. Philip3, born about 1658.
  8. viii. Evert3, born about 1660.

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  1. Rachel2 du Trieux, born at New Amsterdam; married first (banns) Sept. 30, 1656, Hendrick Van Bommel; married second, Aug. 8, 1677, Dirck Jansen de Groot. “Dirck Janszen de Groot, Wedr. Van Wybrug Jans, Rachel Detru, Wede. Van Hendr. Van Bommel, beyde woonende tot N. Yorke.”

Dirck Jansen de Groot was probably from Groet in North Holland, according to Bergen’s “Early Settlers of Kings County”, which also credits him with three wives, not realizing that Rachel Detru and Rachel Philips were one and the same person. They were living on Marketfield Street in 1686, according to Dimine Selyn’s Record. We have no record of any children by his first wife.

Children:- 10, 7 sons and 3 daughters. All baptised at New Amsterdam and New York.

By her first husband (Van Bommel).

  1. i. Hieronymus3, bap. Oct 28, 1657. Witnesses: Isaac de Foreest, Sara du Trieux.
  2. ii. Susanna3, bap. Jan. 25, 1660. Witnesses: Jan de la Montagne, Marie Peeck. No further record.
  3. iii. Leurifaes3, bap. Aug. 20, 1662. Witnesse: Abraham du Trieux, Susanna de Foreest. No further record.
  4. iv. Abraham3, bap. March 14, 1666. Witnesses: Jacob Kip, Maria Kip. No further record.
  5. v. Grietie3, bap. July 1, 1668. Witnesses: Jacob du Trieux, Rebecca du Trieux. Probably died young (see No. 51).
  6. vi. Philip3, bap. Feb. 18, 1672. Witnesses: Johannes de Foreest, Rebecca du Trieux. Died in infancy.
  7. vii. Philip3, bap. Aug. 21, 1675. Witnesses: Philip de Foreest, Susanna Verleth. No further record.

By her second husband (de Groot).

  1. viii. Jan3, bap. March 27, 1678. Witnesses: Jacob Pieterszen, Grietie J__. No further record.
  2. ix. Grietie3, bap. Feb. 8, 1679. Witnesses: Johannes Thomaszen, Aech__ Jacobs.
  3. x. Abraham3, bap. April 26, 1682. Witnesses, Pieter de Riemer, Be___ Ariaens. No further record.

Source:

Truax, T. de T., House of Truax. “Bien faire et ne rien craindre.” Historical Genealogy of the Truax-Truex Families of the United States and Canada, descendants of Philippe de Trieux, the first Huguenot-Knickerbocker of that name who settled in New Netherland in 16__ and embracing his posterity to the present date a period of nearly three centuries of Twelve Generations. Manuscript. From New York Public Library, Call No. NYGB Coll-94 Box 1 and Box 2.http://catalog.nypl.org/record=b18209329~S1 . (Accessed 18Jul2015)

[An interesting history of this manuscript can be found at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~truax/TheHouseofTruax.html]

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Randolph’s House of Truax – Second Generation (Philippe, Maria)

Part I – House of Truax – Etymology
Part II – House of Truax – Historical
Part III – House of Truax – Church records
Part IV – House of Truax – New Amsterdam records
Part V – House of Truax – First Generation
Part VI – House of Truax – Truax Genealogy (Land Records)
Part VI – House of Truax – “First” Generation – Maria
Part VII – House of Truax – Second Generation (Philip, Rachel, Sara)
Part VIII – House of Truax – Second Generation (Susanna, Rebecca, Abraham)
Part IX – Randolph’s House of Truax – Introduction
Part X – Randolph’s House of Truax – First Generation
Part XI – Randolph’s House of Truax – Second Generation (Philippe, Maria) – below

Not to give Philippe short shrift! But Maria is just so darn much fun. She had an illegitimate child (Alida; not mentioned here), possibly a second (Aernoudt, my ancestor, took Cornelis Viele’s patronymic, but there are real doubts), and was in and out of court so much she probably had a chair reserved for her! I’m trying to work through in my head, how a woman whose father was possibly killed by “Indians” was constantly serving alcohol to them. When people tried to sue her for her husband’s debts, she said, they’re his, not mine, I don’t know his business. Other times she was frequently doing business in his name. Toward the end, I was wincing through her many chastisements and punishments, up until she was banished from Manhattan. It is thought she went to Schenectady and I take comfort in the fact that she likely died long before the massacre in 1690.

Our homework is this: Who were the “nine children” in footnote 3? 🙂

So without further adieu, my very own black sheep “party monster” (Thanks, Leighton!) ancestor Maria and her brother Philippe!

  1. Philippe2 du Trieux, bap. at Amsterdam, Holland, Feb. 10, 1619; probably emigrated with his father and step-mother in the New Netherland in 1624; married at New Amsterdam, but the wife of his name is unknown; was murdered, probably by Indians, before Sept. 8th, 1653.

Children: only two recorded, both sons (du Trieux, de Truy, Truax).

  1. i. Isaac3, bap. at New Amsterdam April 21, 1642. Witnesses, Mr. Herman Reyniers, Jan Willemszen Schut, Philip Gerritsz., Sara du Trieux, Sara Roelofs.
  2. ii. Jacob3, bap. at new Amsterdam Dec. 2, 1645. Witnesses, Jan Evertszen Bout, Marie du Trieux, Sara du Trieux. (No’s 5&6 of this genealogy)
  1. Maria2, Marie, or Mary du Trieux. If Maria was older than her sister Sara, as already surmised, she was probably born just before her parents emigrated in 1624, for we know that Sara was born in New Amsterdam, and her marriage banns were published June 9, 1641, she could not have been born much later than 1625. Sarah Jorise Rapalje, “the first Christian daughter born in New Netherland” was born June 9, 1625 [1], and Sara du Trieux’ birth must have occurred soon after. In 1664 Maria was spoken of as “one of the oldest inhabitants of the city of new Amsterdam”, which certainly could not refer to her age, and would seem to indicate that she was one of the settlers of 1624.

The contrast between the two sisters was very great. Whereas Sara married well, and was much respected, Maria was constantly in trouble, and was finally banished from New Amsterdam. The early records abound with references to her, and from these we have culled the following from the “Calendar of Dutch Manuscripts”, the “Records of New Amsterdam”, the “Holland Society Year Book” for 1910, “The Minutes of the Orphan-masters”, Valentine’s “Manuals” for 1861 and 1865; – and the records of the Dutch Church at New Amsterdam.

Page 7

On May 27, 1640, Marie du Trieux had baptised at New Amsterdam a son named Aernoudt. No husband is mentioned, and as at that period the husband’s name only was stated, omitting the wife’s, the natural conclusion is that she was not married at the time. She soon after married Cornelis Volckertsen, and their first son Cornelis was baptised Feb. 5, 1643. On July 13, 1643, Cornelis Volckersz. received a patent for a double lot on the Great Highway, New Amsterdam, and it was here that the family probably lived. And as Cornelis Volckertsen was a tapster and tavernkeeper, this was probably where his tavern was located.

On April 26, 1646 came the first complaint of the “Fiscal” against Maria de Truy, for selling beer to the Indians. This was a real crime, as a drunken Indian might cause much mischief. As time went on these complaints became more numerous, and there can be no doubt but that the accusation was true. On Oct. 11, 1646 Jan Evertsen Bout’s wife sued Mary de Truy, wife of Cornelis Volckertsen, for delivery of boards sold by Volckertsen. “Defendant admits having disposed of the boards to Roeloff Jansen, which her husband had sold to the plaintiff, but says she has boards enough to pay her; judgment for plaintiff, defendant being held for his wife’s acts, unless he declare her disqualified from trading in his absence”. From this we see that Maria was a trader during the absences of her husband, and this will appear again later. Cornelis Volckersen, tavernkeeper, promised to live up to regulations for tapsters and tavernkeepers on March 16, 1643. Shortly after this Volckertsen, to whom she had born two more children, died, for on Feb. 29, 1650 appears the marriage banns of “Marie Volckers, Wede. en Jan Peeck, j. m.”.

Jan Peeck was also a trader, and became a tavernkeeper, possibly on his marriage to Maria. “Jan Peeck, an eccentric character, part Indian trader, part broker between the English and Dutch merchants, and part general speculator. It was this Jan Peeck who, by reason of his making use, as a trading post for traffic with the Indians, of the sheltered haven afforded by the creek emptying into the Hudson River just south of the mountains of the Highlands (even wintering there with his sloop), gave the stream the name of Jan Peeck’s Kill, which name is preserved in that of the adjacent village of Peeckskill

Page 8

in Westchester County. His wife, Maria or Mary, managed his property, and sometimes disposed of it in his long absences. She seems also to have occasionally accompanied him on his trading expeditions, where apparently she acquired considerable acquaintance with the Indians, which she turned to advantage by selling them liquor. [2]

On March 26, 1652 “Maria de Truy, wife of Jan Peeck,” declared “as to what she had heard from an Indian in regard to the killing of a hog whereof Mark Menloff is accused.” Peek with William Pietersen de Groot bought land with houses near the present junction of Roosevelt and Cherry Streets, on Oct. 6, 1654, and on the 19th comes an item with a distinctly modern flavor. “Cornelis van Tienhoven, as Sheriff of this city, represents to the Court, that he has found drinking clubs, on divers nights at the house of Jan Peck, with dancing and jumping and entertainment of disorderly people; also tapping during preaching, and that there was great noise made by drunkards, especially yesterday, Sunday, in this house, so that he was obliged to remove one to jail in a cart, which was a most scandalous affair. He demands, therefore, that Jan Peck’s license be annulled, and that he pay a fine… The Worshipful court… decided, on account of his disorderly house-keeping and evil life, tippling, dancing, gaming and other irregularities, together with tapping at night and on Sunday during Preaching, to annul his license, and that he shall not tap any more, until he shall have vindicated himself.”

This might account for the next item, four days later. “Oct. 23, 1654. Jan Peeck and Claes Hendryckse, carpenter, agree about the sale of a house. Said house, situated on the ‘Groote Heere Wegh’ is granted in exchange for two houses at fort Orange (probably the ones Peeck sold in 1655 to Johannes Dyckman, as given by Pearson)… 600 guilders to Isaack de Foreest as guardian of the children of Jan Peeck’s wife by a former marriage”. On Oct. 26 this further judgment was pronounced: “The Court having hear the demand and Complaint of the Sheriff, and the acknowledgment of Jan Peck, that he has frequently tapped unseasonable after 9 o’clock and bell ring, and that he allowed the Lieutenant’s servant to gamble and dance with Englishmen; also that he tapped on Sunday during the sermon, whereof the Officer complaining warrants that deft. Jan Peck be deprived of his business

Page 9

and condemned in addition, in the fine enacted…; Jan Peck is condemned to lose his license and to pay the fine according to the aforesaid Placard.”

Much chastened, but by no means downed, Peeck, a week later, on Nov. 2, “by Petition humbly requests leave to tap, as the officer has executed the judgment.” On the same day “Marretie Trompetters (the Bugler’s) pltf.” Sues “Maria de Truwe, deft., demands payment of fl. 3.11 for fish he sold to deft. Deft. says, she sent the money by the Servant, and that it fell into the ditch. She has no more at present, but promises payment at the earliest opportunity, wherewith the pltf. being satisfied, they were reconciled.”

But Peeck could not support his large family with no money coming in, and becomes insistent. A week later, on the 9th, is the following item:- “On the instant request, both oral and written, of Jan Peeck, to be allowed to pursue his business as before, inasmuch as he is burthened with a houseful of children and more besides, the Court having considered his complaint, and that he is an old Burgher, have granted his prayer, on condition that he comport himself properly and without blame, and not violate either one of the other of the placards, on pain of having his business stopped, without favor, and himself punished as he deserves, should he be found again in fault”.

Alas for human frailty! A month later, on Dec. 14th, “Arent Jansen, Provost Marshal, pltf., vs. Jan Peeck, deft., demands payment of the fine as deft., first has tapped, notwithstanding the denial of his license; secondly, because he has had tapping and Clubs after nine o’clock. Deft. denies it.” Quite naturally, on the 17th, comes a “Complaint of Mary de Truy, tavern keeper, against the provost”! But on Jan. 26, 1655 comes the final “Judgment. In the case of the farmers of the city excise vs. Jan Peecq, for selling liquor without paying the proper excise; to make a donation to the poor, and not to sell any liquor in future without a permit.”

This source of income being stopped, Peeck turned to real estate. Apparently they had not sold all of the Volckertsen land to Hendryckse in 1654, for on April 20th and 29th, 1655, he sold to Jan Gerritsen, mason; Evert Pels, of

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Renselaerswyck; and Claes Hendricksen, carpenter (this may have been a confirmation of the former agreement); each “a lot on the East side of Broadway, being premises granted July 13, 1643 to Cornelis Volckertsen, deceased, whose widow was married to said Jan Peeck.” On Oct. 12, 1655, he is able to donate fl. 20. For the protection of the city.

With the new year he obtains a new position. The following is a letter he submitted on Feb. 25th, 1656. “Jan Peeck, Burgher and inhabitant here, respectfully makes known, that the Dutch and English merchants have frequently requested him in the matter of their business to act as Broker for them, which he could not permit himself to do without the previous consent of your Honors. And whereas he, the petitioner, is burthened with a wife and nine children [3] and the merchants in general would willingly help him to support his family, he therefore, very respectfully requests, that yours Honors would be pleased to allow him such commission, instruction and salary, either according to the laudable custom of Amsterdam, or as it otherwise shall be deemed advisable. Remaining your Honors’ obedient servant,

Jan Peeck.”

The following day the petition was granted, “as he speaks Dutch and English”.

But the year was not to close without a new trouble developing. On July 24th comes a commitment for “Jan Peecq, tavernkeeper,” but this time the trouble was not primarily of his own making. The next day it appears that he was “imprisoned for having beaten and wounded a soldier in his house… saying he only defended his house because the soldier wanted to run his wife through.” “Whereas Jan Peeck is a Burgher here and firmly established, it was ordered that he be released from his confinement.” Two days later he appears with his witnesses, and nothing more is heard of the case.

Page 11

On November 9th, 1656, Peeck bought a lot in the Smith’s Valley (Smit’s Vly) of Jochem Koch [blogger: isn’t that where Philippe had property?], and in Jan., 1657, he is twice mentioned as pursuing his old business of a tapster. On January 19[?]th, 1658, he buys a house and lot on Smit’s Vly from Frederick Lubbersen, on what is now the corner of Pearl Street and Maiden Lane, but which then faced the East River.

On January 13th, 1660 Mary Peeck appears in three law suits on the same day! In the first the Schepen Cornelis Steenwyck, plaintiff, says “he has attached fl. 150. in beaver in the hands of Cornelis Jansen Clopper, which the deft. claims in payment of certain obligation dated 3. Sept. 1658 executed by the deft’s husband in his favor… requesting that he may lift the money in payment. Deft. says, she does not trouble herself about her husband’s affairs, and that he, pltf., has to look to her husband.” The court ordered Clopper to bring the money in consignment within “three times four and twenty hours”.  In the second suit Maria sues Clopper for the balance of the second installment due on the Smits’ Vly house, which she has agreed to sell to him. “Deft. says, he is ready at all hours to pay, providing that pltf. shows procuration from her husband and gives transport and receipt. Pltf. says it does not concern her husband.” The sale was finally consummated on Feb. 25th, when “Merga (sic) Peeck, wife of Jan Peeck, in the absence of her husband, because the time is elapsed”, sells the house to Clopper. In the third suit Bartholdus Mann sues her for two beavers, “which are good for nothing… Deft. says, he must speak to her husband… she knows nothing about it.”

On August 19, 1660 Maria sold to Jan de Pre a house and lot on Smits’ Vly, next to that she had sold Clopper. On Sept. 28, 1660, Maria was accused of her old crime of tapping after nine o’clock by the Schout, Pieter Tonneman. “Deft. denies it, saying two sat at her house, who counted their money which she owed them, and she did not tap a drop.” This time she was not fined.

On December 8, 1661, “Before the Board appeared Mary de Truy and with her Isaack de Foreest, Old Schepen of this City, and Govert Loockermans, also Old Schepen, guardian of her minor children. Said Mary de Truy requests permission to draw and receive the interest on 500 fl., settled on her children and secured on the house of Andries Joghimsen.” The request was granted.

On January 23, 1663, she is again in court. She accuses “Hermen the soldier” of stealing fifteen legs of venison “from her sister and that deft. visited her house. Deft. denies it, saying he was sent by his master to fetch his wife”. Unfortunately

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the sister is not named, but the fact that she had a sister is added proof that she was a daughter and not a sister of the first Philippe du Trieux.

Then came the climax. On Dec. 18, 1663, Schout Pieter Tonneman stated that he had found last Sunday at her house one Lambert Barensen and that Teunis Tomassen Quick lay asleep by the fire drunk; also that Maatseuw’s mate was met coming quite drunk from defts. house; also she does not have her chimney fixed. “Deft. denies having tapped for any one else, than Lambert Barensen and his wife and only three pints and that such occurred after the second preaching; saying further, that Teunis Tomassen Quick came to her house when drunk and lay down there to sleep.” This was followed on the 30th by “Prosecution of Maria de Truy, wife of Jan Peecq, for selling brandy to the Indians.” She had done this once too often. On Jan. 3, 1664 complaint of the “Fiscal against Maria Truix, wife of Jan Peeck (which, by the way, seems to be the last time he is mentioned in the records) for selling liquor to the Indians.” On the same day sentence was pronounced:- “Maria de Truix, fined 500 guilders and costs, and to be banished from the island of Manhattan.”

But she was not utterly crushed, for on January 24th came a petition. “Maria Peeck, one of the oldest inhabitants of the city of New Amsterdam,” prays for a remission of the sentence pronounced against her, and for leave to remove to Fort Orange. According to “New Amsterdam and Its People” (page 301) “She is said, at this time, to have retired to the new settlement of Schenectady for a short period; but the Dutch regime coming to an end not long after her banishment, she soon returned to New York, and was the owner of a house on Hoogh

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Straet (or Duke’s Street, as the English began to call it), near the Town Hall.”

The last time Maria’s name appears on the records is on Feb. 28, 1670/1. “Isaacq ffooreest, as guardian of the children of Mary Peeck, entering gives to know, that the lot sold by him to Joris Janse Van Hoorn and still charged with a mortgage in favor of Sybrant Janse van Wien was bought by Mary Peeck: he requests therefore, that he may be empowered to discharge the said mortgage and to convey the said lot.”

She is said to have lived with her son Jacobus in Schenectady, and perhaps died there. So exits Maria du Trieux!

Children: 8, 5 sons and 3 daughters.

(Father unknown; surname unknown.)

  1. i. Aernoudt3, bap. at N. A. May 27, 1640. Witnesses: Isaac de foreest, Teunis Cray, Schippr. (Captain); Jan Cant. No further record.

(By her first husband, Cornelis Volckertsen. The children were probably known as Cornelisen and Cornelise.)

  1. ii. Cornelis3, bap. at N. A. Feb. 5, 1643. Witnesses: Philip du Trieux, Anneken Bogardus, Gerrit Molenaer. (It is interesting to find Anneke Jans-Bogardus as one of the sponsors at this baptism.) No further record.
  2. iii. Jacomyntie3, bap. at N. A. Aug. 20, 1645. Witnesses: Jan Evertszen Bout, Isaac Abrahamszen, Schippr., Mr. Paulus, Chirurgyn, Susanna du Trieux (Probably the wife of Philippe1 du Trieux). No further record.
  3. iv. Pieter3, bap. at N. A. Feb. 9, 1648. Witnesses: Aert Willemszen, Goelman Henry, Schout tot Vlissingen (Sheriff at Flushing), eVert Van Embden, Marie Thomas, Barentje Gerrits.

By her second husband, Jan Peeck. The children were known as Peeck, Peek, or Peck, and possibly Jansen.)

  1. v. Anna3, bap. at N. A. Oct 15, 1651. Witnesses: Isaac de Foreest, Aert Willemszen, Rebecca du Trieux (No. 10 of this genealogy), Wyntie Aerts.
  2. vi. Johannes3, bap. at N. An. Oct 12, 1653. Witnesses: Thomas Hall, Claes Hendrickszen, Willem Pieterszen, Engeltje Jans, Susanna du Trieux (probably No. 7 of this genealogy, or else the wife of Philippe1 du Trieux.)
  3. vii. Jacobus3, bap. at N. A. Jan. 16, 1656. Witnesses, Frederick Lubbertszen, Simon de Groot, Tysje Willems.
  4. viii. Maria3, bap. at N. A. March 6, 1658. Witnesses, Hendrick Van Bommel, en syn huys vr., Cornelis Pluvier, en syn huys vr. No further record.

[1] If Sarah Rapalje was not born until June, 1625, how does one account for the statement of Krol at Amsterdam in November, 1624, who – speaking of New Amsterdam – declared “there are pregnant women there, for the baptism of whose children provision must be made”? See N. Y. Gen. & Biog. Record, Vol. LV, page 7.

[2] “New Amsterdam and Its People”, by J. H. Innes, page 301.

[3] Who were these nine children? Besides his wife’s first child, we have records of but three she bore to Volckertsen, and but three she had borne to Peeck up to this time, the last having been baptised Jan. 16, 1656. This accounts for seven children only, providing that they were all living. Peeck was, according to his marriage record, a bachelor at the time of his marriage to the widow Volckertsen. It seems probable that Volckertsen was a widower with children when Maria du Trieux married him, and that those children were now living with Peeck. In that case, of the nine children, only three would have been his own!

Source:

Truax, T. de T., House of Truax. “Bien faire et ne rien craindre.” Historical Genealogy of the Truax-Truex Families of the United States and Canada, descendants of Philippe de Trieux, the first Huguenot-Knickerbocker of that name who settled in New Netherland in 16__ and embracing his posterity to the present date a period of nearly three centuries of Twelve Generations. Manuscript. From New York Public Library, Call No. NYGB Coll-94 Box 1 and Box 2.http://catalog.nypl.org/record=b18209329~S1 . (Accessed 18Jul2015)

[An interesting history of this manuscript can be found at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~truax/TheHouseofTruax.html]

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Randolph’s House of Truax – First Generation

Part I – House of Truax – Etymology
Part II – House of Truax – Historical
Part III – House of Truax – Church records
Part IV – House of Truax – New Amsterdam records
Part V – House of Truax – First Generation
Part VI – House of Truax – Truax Genealogy (Land Records)
Part VI – House of Truax – “First” Generation – Maria
Part VII – House of Truax – Second Generation (Philip, Rachel, Sara)
Part VIII – House of Truax – Second Generation (Susanna, Rebecca, Abraham)
Part IX – Randolph’s House of Truax – Introduction
Part X – Randolph’s House of Truax – First Generation – below

This is entrancing! I was typing away past my bedtime – First Generation is short – but a great summary. Second generation treats Maria (my ancestor) thoroughly! That is to come after this one. Hope you enjoy this summary of Philippe and his two wives.

Page 5

First Generation

  1. Philippe1 du Trieux, born about 1586; married first about 1615 or earlier Jacqueline Noiret; married second about 1621 Susanna du Chesne; emigrated to New Amsterdam probably in 1624 on the New Netherland; died between 1649 and 1653. Children; 9 (du Trieux, de Truy), 3 sons and 6 daughters.

By his first wife:

  1. i. Philippe2, bap. at Amsterdam, Holland, Jan. 3, 1616. Probably died in infancy, as a second child of this name was bap. in 1619.
  2. ii. Philippe2, bap. at Amsterdam, Holland, Feb. 10, 1619.
  3. iii. Madeline2, bap. at Amsterdam, Holland, Feb. 9, 1620. Probably died in infancy.

By his second wife:

  1. iv. Maria2 or Mary. Probably born in Holland. From the fact that her name appears first on both occasions when she and her sister Sara act as sponsors at Baptisms in the Dutch Church, New Amsterdam, on Dec. 2, 1645 and Feb. 2, 1649, it would seem that she was the older of the two sisters. It has been suggested that Maria was a sister of Philippe1 du Trieux, but as she began bearing children in 1640, and as she constantly appeared as sponsor at the baptisms of her nephew and nieces, this seems most improbable. [blogger’s note: She was indeed a daughter of Philippe, but of his first wife, bp. Amsterdam 05 Apr 1617 [1]]
  2. v. Sara2. Born in New Netherlands.
  3. vi. Susanna2. Born in New Netherlands.

Page 6

  1. vii. Rachel2. Born [crossed off]
  2. viii. Abraham2. Probablyh born in New Amsterdam.
  3. ix. Rebecca2. Born in New Netherlands.

[1] Child:  Marijie; Parents, Phelipe du Trier, Jacquemine Nouret; 5 Apr 1617;
Oude Waalse kerk;  DTB 130/45  (Waalse Reformed)
tesmoing Francois du Pire et Jacque Corteman; maryne (maraine)  Jenne Touret (Noiret?)

Source:

Truax, T. de T., House of Truax. “Bien faire et ne rien craindre.” Historical Genealogy of the Truax-Truex Families of the United States and Canada, descendants of Philippe de Trieux, the first Huguenot-Knickerbocker of that name who settled in New Netherland in 16__ and embracing his posterity to the present date a period of nearly three centuries of Twelve Generations. Manuscript. From New York Public Library, Call No. NYGB Coll-94 Box 1 and Box 2.http://catalog.nypl.org/record=b18209329~S1 . (Accessed 18Jul2015)

[An interesting history of this manuscript can be found at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~truax/TheHouseofTruax.html]

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Randolph’s House of Truax – Introduction

Part I – House of Truax – Etymology
Part II – House of Truax – Historical
Part III – House of Truax – Church records
Part IV – House of Truax – New Amsterdam records
Part V – House of Truax – First Generation
Part VI – House of Truax – Truax Genealogy (Land Records)
Part VI – House of Truax – “First” Generation – Maria
Part VII – House of Truax – Second Generation (Philip, Rachel, Sara)
Part VIII – House of Truax – Second Generation (Susanna, Rebecca, Abraham)

Part IX – Randolph’s House of Truax – Introduction – below

Randolph’s House of Truax – Introduction

Here starts a typed manuscript. It appears the project was picked up by Howard S. F. Randolph after Theodore de T. Truax’s death, apparently in preparation for printing in the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. (The reader can reference this article in NYG&BR 57:208, 57:336, 58:76, 58:111, 58:267, 58:326, 59:17, 59:182, 59:284, 59:386.) This was, incidentally, around the same time Mrs. Thura Truax Hires took up her project.

It is very important to note the findings on a) Philippe’s parents, and b) Philippe’s date of death.

Page: Title

The

House of Truax

Descendants of Philippe du Trieux

1586-1653

Edited by

Howard S. F. Randolph

from a manuscript by

T. de T. Truax

In the possession of

The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society

1926

First page

The House of Truax

Descendants of Philippe du Trieux, 1586-1653.

Edited by Howard S. F. Randolph from a manuscript by T. de T. Truax in the possession of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society.

It is a great loss to posterity that there does not seem to be any list extant of the passengers of the New Netherland in its famous voyage from Amsterdam to New Amsterdam in 1624. If some record of this voyage had been preserved, with a complete list of the settlers thereon, the fame of the New Netherland would undoubtedly rival that of the Mayflower. Of the “company of 30 families, mostly Walloons” which Wassenaer mentions, we know with certainty the names of only one family, and that family consisted of Joris Jansen Rapalje and his wife Catalina Trico.

But there seems to be a general concensus of opinion that another of these families consisted of Philippe du Trieux and his second wife Susannah du Chesne, probably with two children, a son of his first marriage, and a daughter of his second [blogger’s note: apparently inaccurate; for example, Maria of his first marriage clearly came with him]. The Genealogical Record of the St. Nicholas Society (1916) says of Philippe du Trieux:- “He was assuredly one of the very first settlers of the city”. “The de Forests of Avesnes” state:- “No list of Mey’s emigrants has survived; but we are certain that two of them were Philippe du Trieux and his wife Jacqueline Noiret”[1], and again, “the bride’s (Sara du Trieux’) father and mother undoubtedly came over on the New Netherland, in the famous voyage of 1624”. And “A Walloon Family in America” says:- “There is not much doubt that Philippe and Susanna were among the colonists who came to New Amsterdam on board the New Netherland.”

Of the antecedants of Philippe du Trieux we know nothing. The manuscript from which this genealogy is edited traces numerous families of similar names, but as none of them can be linked with Philippe du Trieux they are omitted. The only clue we have is contained in the record of the Walloon Church at

Page 1a

Leyden:- “April 22, 1601. Jaquemyne, widow of Philippe du Trieu, received into Church of Leyden, by letter from Norwich, England.” This Jaquemyne and her deceased husband might well have been the parents of the Philippe who came to New Amsterdam in 1624, but we have no proof that such is the case. [blogger: emphasis mine]

Nor do we know his birthplace. A possible clue is contained in “A Walloon Family in America”, which, quoting the church record at Amsterdam, says Philippe was a worsted-dyer from Robez (Roubaix), not very far from Avesnes.” We do, however, know the date of his birth. In a declaration he made at “Fort Amsterdam” on August 15, 1639, to be quoted later, he states his age as 53 years; so he was probably born in 1586. There can be no doubt

Page 2

That he was a Walloon.

Philippe du Trieux married for his first wife Jacqueline (or Jacquemine) Noiret, which we also know from the records of the Walloon Church at Amsterdam and Leyden, quoted in full on page 188 of “The de Forests of Avesnes”:-

Jan. 3, 1616. Amsterdam; baptized, Philippe, son of Philippe u Trieu and his wife Jacqueline Noiret.
Oct. 1617. Received into the ch. of Leyden, by letter from Amsterdam, Philippe du Trieu and his wife Jaquemine Norret.
Dec. 31, 1617. Received into the ch. of Amsterdam, by letter from Leyden, Philipe du Tryheu and Jaquemine Norret.
Feb. 10, 1619. Bap. at Amsterdam, Philip, son of Philip du Trieux and Jacquemin Nouret.
 Feb. 9, 1720 [sic]. Bap. at Amsterdam, Madeleine, dau. of Philippe du Trieux and Jacquemine Noiret.

It would seem probable that both Jacqueline Noiret and her baby Madeleine died soon after this last baptism, for in 1621, according to the Genealogical Record of the St. Nicholas Society, “he was in Amsterdam with a second wife, Susannah du Chesne, and together they applied for a transfer from their church [blogger: pour West-Inde] in 1624.”

We do not know in particular the reasons which prompted Philippe du Trieux to go to America, but we do know that these reasons were in general the same as those which induced fifty-six men (with their families, in all two hundred and twenty seven men, women and children) to sign the “Round Robin” of Jesse de Forest in 1621. In fact, one of these men was Jan de Trou, a woolcomber, who was in all probability some relative of Philippe’s. He wanted to accompany Jesse de Forest to Virginia, with his wife and children. And Philippe du Trieux himself was a dyer, as was de Forest, and was undoubtedly acquainted with him, perhaps intimately. However that may be, Philippe du Trieu and his family probably sailed on the New Netherland in the beginning of April, 1624[2], and arrived at New Amsterdam in May or June.

And then, for thirteen or fourteen years, there are no records of Philippe du Trieux. During this period their six children were born, and Philippe erected a house on the Bever Graft, though later he lived on Smits Vly. J. H. Innes,

Page 3

in “New Amsterdam and its people” (page 326), states of this Smits Vly property:-

“As early as 1638, this parcel of land was in the possession of Philip du Trieux (or de Truy, as the Dutch generally designated him), who was long the Court “Messenger”, or marshal, at New Amsterdam. Philip was one of the older residents, and seems to have been one of the first, if not the very first to build upon the Bever Graft, or the modern Beaver Street, where for a number of years he had a house. In 1640 he received his ground-brief or patent for the land adjoining Secretary Van Tienhoven’s farm, and seems to have resided upon it, for about that time he with several others of that vicinity make a formal contract with Claes Groen and Pieter Lievesen for the herding of their goats for a whole year, at the munificent sum of one guilder, or about forty cents per year for each goat. This important document is entered with much formality upon the Register of the Secretary of the Council.

Philip de Truy had died some time before 1653: he seems to have leased or to have contracted to sell this place to Nicholas Stilwel, for in 1649 we find the latter promising to furnish one Henry Bresar with “palisades” enough to fence the premises along the river road, and within two years to furnish enough more to fence the other sides of the land, in consideration of which, Bresar acknowledges that “he has taken off the hands of Nicholaes Stillwell the land and dwelling house” in question. Bresar seems to have remained in possession of the place till about the year 1653, when he built a new house a short distance beyond the ferry, on some land which he had acquired there, and the former dwelling-house of Philip de Truy, after one or two intermediate changes, was bought, in August, 1654, by Thomas Hall”.

In support of the probable friendship between Jesse de Forest and his family and Philippe du Trieux, “A Walloon Family in America” (page 111) says:-

“In 1637, when the de Forests arrived in New Amsterdam, Philippe du Trieux was quite an old inhabitant, and we may be sure that he had a warm welcome ready for Jesse de Forest’s children. Indeed, it is on record that almost as soon as they established themselves in the Muscoota bouwery Philippe furnished the family with pumpkins! Now pumpkins may not have been a very romantic means of communication between two young people, but they must have been extremely acceptable none the less and they certainly indicate intercourse between the two families; it is not surprising, therefore, that Isaak de Forest and Sara du Trieux should have become interested in one another.”

Philippe du Trieux was appointed Court Messenger by Governor Kieft in 1638. Some of his duties are suggested in the article on Domine Bogardus by D. T. Valentine in his “Manual” for 1863 (page 595), in the famous slander case instituted by the Domine’s wife, Anneke Jans, against Grietje Reiniers, the wife of Anthony Jansen Van Salee:-

“October 4, 1638. Philip De Truy, the messenger, appeared and made solemn declaration that he went, on the order of Rev. Bogardus, to the house of Anthony Jansen Van Salee, to beseech him to pay the money for which he was delinquent, and that said Anthony said, in answer: ‘If the Minister requires the payment of the money at once, then I will rather lose my head than pay him, and if he insists on this course of procuring his money, it may yet cause an effusion of blood.’ Said De Truy then tried to pacify him with regard to Bogardus, and assured him that he was poor. Upon which said Anthony answered, that the course taken by Bogardus impeached their

Page 4

honor, and implied that they were dishonest, and said further, ‘Should I clean the minister and remain unclean myself, what a foolish thing would that be’.”

The following list gives, in chronological order, the references to Philip de Truy (du Trieux) contained in the “Calendar of Dutch Manuscripts”, edited by E. B. O’Callaghan:-

July 26, 1638. Return of Phililp de Truy, court messenger, to a summons on Gillis Pietersen.
Aug. 26, 1638. Simon Dirckson Pos vs. Philip de Truy, action of debt.
Sept. 2, 1638. Same. Claim canceled on defendant delivering to plaintiff all the fish in his house.
Oct. 4, 1638. Philip de Truy and Wolphert Gerritsen (declaration), respecting language of Anthony Jansen of Salee, when asked to pay money to the Rev. Mr. Bogardus (quoted above).
Mar. 15, 1639. Declaration. Jacob Stoffelsen and others that Grietje Reyniers called Philip de Truy a liar, and that they called each other several bad names.
Mar. 15, 1639. Declaration. Jacob Stoffelsen and others that Anthony Jansen called Philip de Truy a villian [sic].
Mar. 15, 1639. Declaration. Rev. Everardus Bogardus, that Philip de Truy said to Grietje Reyniers, If you can prove me a liar…
Mar. 30, 1639. Thomas Sandersen as to words between the wife of Anthony Jansen and Phililp de Truy.
Mar. 24, 1639. Philip de Truy vs. Anthony Jansen from Salee, slander. Default.
Mar. 31, 1639. Same.
Apl. 28, 1639. Philip de Truy vs. Anthony Jansen from Salee, for delivery of a piece of land; judgment for defendant.
Aug. 15, 1639. Declaration. Philip de Truy, Peter van der Linde, and Jan Hendricksen, that Edward Wilson had kicked the wife of Truy’s gardner [sic]. (It is in this declaration that du Trieux states his age as 53 years, as already mentioned. The original was lost in the fire of March 29, 1911 which consumed the State Library in the Capitol, but a copy was kindly furnished from the manuscript translation of Dr. E. B. O’Callaghan by Edward F. Rowse, of the New York State Library.)
May 22, 1640. Patent. Philip de Truy, court messenger; land near Smith’s valley, Manhattan Island.
Dec. 14, 1640. Declaration. Philip de Truy, Juriaen Rodloff, and Hans Schreuder, as to the testimentary [sic] disposition of his effects, made by Juriaen Gerles.
Oct. 15, 1641. Receipt of Peter Andriessen for a milch cow from Philip de Truy on shares.
Feb. 8, 1649. Acceptance, by Henry Breser, of Philip de Truy’s house and lot from Nicholas Stillwell.
July 23, 1649. Power of attorney. Cornelius Segersen of Renselaerswyck, to Phililp de Truy, to collect a debt of Jacobus van Curler.
Mar. 16, 1651. Certified copy of a note of Alexander Boyer, in favor of Susanna de Truy.

From these homely records some idea of the activities of Philippe du Trieux in New Amsterdam can be gleaned.

We do not know when he died, but we know it was between July, 1649 (above), and Sept., 1653. For in the “Records of New Amsterdam” (Vol. I, page 114), under

Page 5

date of Sept. 8, 1653, appears the following:-

“Carel Van Brugge, pltf. Vs. Isaac d’Foreest, deft. Pltf. As vendue-master of the personal estate of Pieter Cornelisen, mill-wright, demands payment of fl. 59;8 for goods purchased at public vendue. Deft. acknowledges having purchased the goods, but says, in the name of Philip d’Truy’s widow, that her son Philip (who was also murdered) has earned fl. 100 monthly wages of Pieter Cornelisen dec’d, which are still due him. Deft. is ordered to prove at the next Court day his demand against the estate of the above-named Pieter Cornelisen deceased”.

From the above we learn that Philippe du Trieux was dead, and that his son Philippe had been murdered. It would seem probable that the son had been murdered by Indians, though this is not expressly stated, and it is not impossible that the father himself had been so murdered. But there is no documentary proof to show whether this was so or not. On October 23, 1654

“Susanne de Scheeve, widow of Philip De Truwe, late Court messenger at New Amsterdam, confers powers of attorney upon her son-in-law Isaack de (   ), burgher and free trader at New Amsterdam. [3]

And with this last note the names of Susannah and Philippe du Trieux disappear from the records of New Amsterdam.

[1] Jacqueline was his first wife. It is now established that it was his second wife Susannah du Chesne who immigrated with Philippe du Trieux.

[2] See N. Y. Gen. & Biog. Record, Vol. LV, page 6

[3] Holland Society Year Book, 1900, page 176.

Source:

Truax, T. de T., House of Truax. “Bien faire et ne rien craindre.” Historical Genealogy of the Truax-Truex Families of the United States and Canada, descendants of Philippe de Trieux, the first Huguenot-Knickerbocker of that name who settled in New Netherland in 16__ and embracing his posterity to the present date a period of nearly three centuries of Twelve Generations. Manuscript. From New York Public Library, Call No. NYGB Coll-94 Box 1 and Box 2.http://catalog.nypl.org/record=b18209329~S1 . (Accessed 18Jul2015)

[An interesting history of this manuscript can be found at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~truax/TheHouseofTruax.html]

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House of Truax – Second Generation (Susanna, Rebecca, Abraham)

Part I – House of Truax – Etymology
Part II – House of Truax – Historical
Part III – House of Truax – Church records
Part IV – House of Truax – New Amsterdam records
Part V – House of Truax – First Generation
Part VI – House of Truax – Truax Genealogy (Land Records)
Part VI – House of Truax – “First” Generation – Maria
Part VII – House of Truax – Second Generation (Philip, Rachel, Sara)
Part VIII – House of Truax – Second Generation (Susanna, Rebecca, Abraham) – below

This is the last (that I have noticed) of the handwritten MSS. I rather suspect the handwritten parts may have been the editor? Who knows. This one concludes the second generation, but only temporarily, as there is more inserted later as it is discovered. Sadly, there are a couple of pages missing – I am not sure if I missed taking the photograph, or if they are missing from the file.

Happy Hunting!

Second Generation (Susanna, Rebecca, Abraham)

Page 114

6 – Susanna du Trieux (Wendel)2, a daughter of Philippe du Trieux1, married Evert Janszen (Wendel), as per the following verbatim copy from the marriage record of the old Dutch Church of New York, p 576, and page 35 of the “N.Y. Gen: & Biog: Record.”

“den 31 July Ao 1644. Evert Janszen, j. m. van Embden, en Susanna du Trieux, j. d. van N. Nederlt.”

P 115

They had issue as per following record from Vol 5 of the “N.Y. Gen: & Biog: Record” of Baptisms in the old Dutch church of N. Y.

Ouders Kinders Getuygen
Page 86 (265)

34 – I

“den 18 Sept. Ao 1645

Evert Janszen

Thomas (no name in the original copy. Name taken from Talcott’s Histy). Isaac de Foreest

Tryntje Roelofs”

Page 89 (268)

35 – II

“den 27 Jan Ao 1647

Evert Janszen van den En den

Elsje De Hr Willem Kieft, Gouvneur

Isaac de Foreest

Tryntie Roelofs”

Page 92 (274)

36 – III

“den 2 Feb Ao 1649

Evert Janszen

Johannes Phililp du Trieux

Mr Paulus van der Buck

Johannes Rodenburg

Maria en Sara du Trieux”

Page 95 (277)

37 – IV

“den 27 Nov Ao 1650

Evert Janszen

Dievertje Susanna Philips”

No further data of his issue has been discovered in the above records. The following additional births are from the “N. Y. Gen: and Biog: Records” pp 376 and 377.

38 – V, Diewertje, born in 1653

39 – VI, Jeronimus (Hieronimus), born in 1655

40 – VII, Philip, born in 1658

41 – VIII, Evert, born in 1660

Page 114

Evert Jansen Wendel was born in 1615, at Emden, a town of about 12,000 inhabitants, situated at the mouth of the river “Ems”, in the northwestern extremity of Hanover, now part of Prussia.

He came to New Amsterdam about the year 1642, where he obtained a patent for a lot – as per Talcott’s History – in what was then called the “Graft,” now Beaver Street; but on or about 1651, he settled at Fort Orange (Albany), where he owned a house and lot – as per Prof. Pearson – on the north corner of James and State streets, which was later occupied by his son Thomas. In 1656, he became a ruling Elder in the Dutch church at Albany; and was appointed Orphan Master on the 7th of February 1567; and Magistrate in 1660 and 1661.

He died as per “Valentine’s Manuel” of 1861 during the year 1709, aged 94 years. His wife Susanna, died about 1660; and in 1663 he married Maritje Abrahamse, widow of Thomas Janse Mingael, and daughter of Abraham Pieter Vosburgh.

The following will of Evert Jansen Wendell, appears in “Pearson’s Albany County Records,” pp 327-8.

“In the name of the Lord amen: Be it known by the contents of this present instrument, that in the year sixteen hundred and sixty-three, the 30th of June appeared before me Johannes La Montague,

[Pages 116-117 missing?]

Page 118

7 – Abraham du Trieux2, a son of Philippe1, married whom, when and where (?)

As per court minutes of the record of “New Amsterdam” Vol I, page 285, he was a resident there as appears from the following extract.

“1655. Monday the 8th Feb: In City Hall. Abraham de Truwe and Jacob Teunissen, considered in default in an action brought by Borger Jorisen for the recovery of a boat, were summoned to appear in court, by the next Court day, that the plaintiff might institute an action against them.”

It would seem from page ibid 287 of the same volume that on the following 22d of February, the above case was called, but as no proof of the defendants having taken the boat, appeared; the case was held over for further disposition.

On the 8th of March following, as per page ibid 293, the case was again called, and as one Maryn Luyckesen was proved to have said, “Let the boat be brought back; I will pay the expense.”, it was decided by the court (as Maryn LuYckesen is in default, and the aforesaid declaration affects him), that no further disposition can now be made of the matter, than default.”

The following year (1656) Abraham du Trieux was in Beverwyck (Albany), as per Prof. Pearson.

As per Vol 4, page 384, “Munsell’s Coll: of the history of Albany”, Abraham de Truwe was the skipper of a sloop (a small vessel) from “Fort Orange” (Albany).

They had issue:-

42 – I, Maria, born in Albany, (as per Prof. Pearson)

Page 119

8 – Rebecca du Trieux (Groot)2, a daughter of Philippe du Trieux1, married Symon Symonse Groot, as per Prof. Pearson.

Page ? [possibly 120]

They had issue as per Prof. Pearson.

43 – I, Symon, see Second Generation.

44 – II, Abraham, see Second Generation.

45 – III, Philip, see Second Generation.

46 – IV, Dirk, see Second Generation.

47 – V, Cornelis

48 – VI, Claas

49 – VII, Susanna, see Second Generation.

50 – VIII, Maria, see Second Generation.

51 – IX, Rebecca, see Second Generation.

52 – X, Sara, see Second Generation.

Page 119

He was the first settler by that name in New Netherland, and came in the service of the West India Company, as boatswain in the ship “Prince Maurice” in 1633. In 1645 he bought a house and lot of Jacob Roy, in New Amsterdam. Soon thereafter he removed to Beverwyck, where he purchased or built a house which in 1654 he offered for sale. He had lately withdrawn from the service of the West India Company, against whom he held a claim for services of 834 guilders.

In 1662, being about to remove to “Esopus” (Kingston), he empowered Johannes Withart to sell his house and lot; but it is evident that he changed his purpose, for in 1663 he hired a bouwery of 25 or 30 morgens, of Gerrit Bancker and Harmen Vedderen, at Schenectady, and still retained possession of his house in Albany as late as 1667.

His house and lot in Schenectady was on the north side of Union street, 100 amsterdam feet westerly from Church street, running through to Front street, and remained in the family more than a hundred years.

On the sad night of the 8th of February 1690, his five sons, Symon; Abraham; Philip, Dirk and Claas were taken captive by the French and Indians and carried to Canada; the following year they were redeemed. (Prof. Pearson’s account)

Source:

Truax, T. de T., House of Truax. “Bien faire et ne rien craindre.” Historical Genealogy of the Truax-Truex Families of the United States and Canada, descendants of Philippe de Trieux, the first Huguenot-Knickerbocker of that name who settled in New Netherland in 16__ and embracing his posterity to the present date a period of nearly three centuries of Twelve Generations. Manuscript. From New York Public Library, Call No. NYGB Coll-94 Box 1 and Box 2.http://catalog.nypl.org/record=b18209329~S1 . (Accessed 18Jul2015)

[An interesting history of this manuscript can be found at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~truax/TheHouseofTruax.html]

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House of Truax – Second Generation (Philip, Rachel, Sara)

Part I – House of Truax – Etymology
Part II – House of Truax – Historical
Part III – House of Truax – Church records
Part IV – House of Truax – New Amsterdam records
Part V – House of Truax – First Generation
Part VI – House of Truax – Truax Genealogy (Land Records)
Part VI – House of Truax – “First” Generation – Maria

Part VII – House of Truax – Second Generation (Philip, Rachel, Sara) – below

I set myself up for a lot of typing tonight! Please enjoy the following second generation info. I pick up next time with Susanna.

It is pointed out that Maria’s first husband was not listed in the last entry. That is correct. This is corrected much later in the MSS.

Found mention of another ancestor (a bp witness – Hendrick van Dyck) – it was a small world! 🙂

P 105

Second Generation

The following baptismal records are verbatim copies from the records of the old Dutch church of New Amsterdam, and as found in Vol. 5 of the “New York Gen’l and Biog’l Records of N. Y.”

Ouders Kinders Getuygen
9 – I

“den 21 Apr. Ao 1642

Philip du Trieux

Isaacsen Mr. herman Reyniers

Jan Willemszen Schut

Philip Gerritsz

Sara du Trieux

Sara Roelefs”

P (235) 51

10 – II

“den 2 Dec Ao 1645

Philip du Trieux

Jacob Jan Evertszen Bout

Maria du Trieux

Sara du Trieux

P (265) 87

P 106

4 – Rachel Detrien (van Bommel)2, a daughter of Philippe du Trieux1, married Hendrick van Bommel as per record of the old Dutch church of New York, p 594; in Vol 6, p 85 of the “N. Y. Gen: & Biog: Record,” as follows:

“den 30 Sept. 1656. Hendrick van Bommel, en Rachel Detrien, van Amsterdam in N. Nederlt.”

Subsequent she married as per Ibid, p 634, in Vol 7 p 29 (634 crossed off)

Ingeschreven den 22 Jul Ao 1677

Dirk Janszen de Groot, Wedr van Wybria Jans, Rachel Detri, wede van Hendr. Van Bommel, beyde woonende tot N. Yorke.” He, most probable was a native of Groet, in North Holland; as per p 88 T. G. Bergen in “Early Settlers of Kings County, L. I.”

Getrouwt den 8 Aug Ao 1677

Page 107

They had issue as per following records from the “N. Y. Gen: & Biog Records”, and as contained in the Baptisms of the old Dutch church of New York.

Ouders Kinders Getygen
11 – I Vol 5 p 187? (300)

“den 28 Oct Ao 1657

Hendrick van Bommel

Roselle du Trieux

Hieronymus Isaac de Foreest

Sara du Trieux”

12 – II Vol 6 p 46 (309)

“den 25 Jan Ao 1660

Hendr van Bommel

Rachel du trueux

Susanna Jan de la Montagne

Marie Peeck”

13 – III Vol 6 p 150 (319)

“den 20 Aug Ao 1662

Hendrick van Bommel

Rachel du Trieux

Luerifaes Abraham du Trieux

Susanna de Foreest”

14 – IV Vol 7 p 70 (338)

“den 14 Mart Ao 1666

Hendrick van Bommel

Rachel de Trieux

Abraham Jacob Kip

Maria Kip”

15 – V Vol 7 p 127 (347)

“den 1 Jul Ao 1668

Hendrick van Bommel

Rachel Roscelje”

Grietie Jacob du Trieux

Rebecca du Trieux”

16 – VI Vol 8 p 25 (362)

“den 18 Febr Ao 1672

Hendrick van Bommel

Rachel du Trieux

Philip Johannes de Foreest

Rebecca du Trieux”

Page 108
17 – VII Vol 8 p 86 (375 (a))

“den 21 Aug Ao 1675

Hendrick van Bommel

Rachel du Trieux

Philip Philip de Foreest

Susanna Verleth”

Issue of the second marriage
18 – VIII Vol 8 p 170 (388)

“den 27 Mart Ao 1678

Dirck Jansz de Groot

Rachel du Trieux

Jan Jaob Pieterszen

Grietie Jans”

19 – IX Vol 8 p 175 (392)

“den 8 Febr Ao 1679

Dirck Janszen de Groot

Rosella du Trieux

Grietie Johannes Thomaszen

Aechtie Jacobs”

  1. Sept. 4.

One Rachell du True appears as defendant in an action of law. (See “Records of New Amsterdam,” Vol VII, p 119)

Page 109

5 – Sara du Treux (de Forest)2, a daughter of Philippe du Trieux, married Isaac de Foreest as per following record from p 571 of the “Trouw Boeck” of the old Dutch church of New York; and Vol 6 page 33 of the “N. Y. Gen: and Biog: Records.”

“den 9 June Ao 1641. Isaacq de Foreest, j. m. van Leyden, en Sara du Treux, j. d. van N. Nederlt.”

He was baptised at Leyden, Holland on the 10th of July 1616, a son of Jessen de Foreest and Maria du Cloux, and died in 1682, aged 66 years.

She died on the 9th of November 1692, aged about 69 years.

Isaac de Foreest emigrated to this country in 1636, on the ship “Rensselaerwyck” with his brother Henry: both settled in harlem N. Y., where they located a tobacco plantation of 100 acres upon that which was then a virgin forest. In 1650 he sold his bouwery in Harlem to William Beeckman, and became a brewer, with a malt-house and his residence on the north side of Stone Street. He also had a hopyard and an orchard at a place called “Norman’s Bright.” His request for the privileges of the “Great Burgher” rights was granted by Stuyvesant and council on the 28th of January 1658, nearly one year after his formal application had been made. During the same year he was elected “schepen,” an office resembling in function that of an alderman.

In 1664, at the time New York was seized by the English, he was taken prisoner. He was released soon after, and swore allegiance. He made his will on the 4th of June 1672. For further particulars see the De Forest Gen; Riker’s Revised Harlem; Prof. Pearson’s Early Settlers, etc.

Page 110

They had issue as per records of the Ref Dutch church of N. Y., in and contained in the “N. Y. Gen: and Biog: Records,” as follows.

Ouders Kinders Getuygen
20 – I Vol 5 p 32 (257)

“den 9 Nov Ao 1642

Isaacq de Foreest

Jessen Jochem Pieterszen

Philip du trieux

Madem de La Montagne

Sara Roelofs”

21 – II Vol 5 p 87 (263)

“den 22 Jan Ao 1645

Isaac de Foreest, en

Sara du Trieux

Susanna Mr. an de Minuiet

Jean de la Montagne

Susanna de Trieux.”

22 – III  Vol 5, p 87 (266)
“den 21 May Ao 1646Isaac de Foreest
Gerrit Gerrit de Foreest

Gerrit Janszen van Haerlem

Harmen Bartiaenszen

Sytje Roelefs”

23 – IV Vol 5 p 89 (269)

“den 10 Jun Ao 1647

Isaac de Foreest

Gerrit Gerrit de Foreest

Gerret Janszen Klinckharmer

Harmen Bastiaenszen

Sytje Roelofs”

24 – V, 25 – VI Vol 5, p 92 (274)

“den 27 Jan Ao 1649

Isaac de Foreest

Marie

Michiel

Tweeling

Hendrick Van dyck, Fiscael

Adrien Janszen van _lpendam

Agnietie Montagne

Geertie Abrahams”

All of the above issue, except Susanna, died unmarried; she married Peter de Reimer in 1665. (See Riker’s Revised Harlem).
Page 111
26 – VI [sic] Vol 5 p 94 (276)

“den 27 Mart Ao 1650

Isaac de Foreest

Jan Hendrick van Dyck

Adrian Elpendam

Susanna Everts

Agnietie de la Montagne.”

“Jan de Foreest was educated a “chirugeon” (physician); and, on the 8th of June 1673, he married Susannah, daughter of Nicholas Verlet.” (See Rikers Revised Harlem).
27 – VII [sic] Vol 5 p 99 (283)

“den 28 Jul Ao 1652

Isaac de Foreest

Philip Jan de La Montagne

Jan Peeck

Susanna du Trieux”

Philip de Foreest was a cooper by trade; and, on the 5th of January 1676, he married Tryntie, daughter of Hendricks Kip, and removed to Albany, served as high-sheriff, etc, and died in 1727, aged 75 years;” having left among others a son David, who was the ancestor of Colonel Jacob J. de Forest, late of Duanesburg (See Rikers Revised Harlem), father of Sherman Duryea de Forest, who married Maggie (Mamie) Elizabeth Truax, daughter of the editor of this volume.
28 – VIII [sic] Vol 5, p 154 (292)
“den 25 April Ao 1655Isaac de ForeestSara du Tryeux
Isaac Jan Peeck

Mr. Gysbert van Imbroeck

Marritje van Imbroeck

Tryntie de Haes”

Isaac de Foreest was the only son of Isaac, who remained in New York. He became a baker by trade and, on the 4th day of September 1681, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Lawrence Vanderspiegel. (See Rikers Revised Harlem.)
Page 112
29 – IX Vol 5 p 180 (300)

“den 9 Aug Ao 1657

Isaac de Foreest

Sara du Trieux

Hendrick Willem Beeckman

Maria Kip

Petronella de la Montagne”

Hendrick de Foreest became a glazier, and on the 5th of July 1682, he married Phebe, daughter of Barent van Flaesbeek, and settled at Bushwick, Long Island, where he became a justice of the peace in 1698. He bought land at, and removed to “Madman’s Neck” where he died in 1715, aged 58 years. (See Rikers Revised Harlem.)
30 – X Vol 6 p 89 (310)

“den 1 Aug Ao 1660

Isaac de Foreest

Sara du Trieux

David Jacob Kip

d’huysvr von John ver Veelen”

David de Foreest died in infancy
31 – XI Vol 6 p 155

“den 19 Dec Ao 1663

Isaac de Foreest

Sara du Trieux

David Jeronymus Ebbing

Femmetie Kip”

David the second, also died in infancy.
32 – XII Vol 7 p 71 (339)

“den 7 July Ao 1666

Isaac de Foreest

Sara de Trieux

Maria Jacob Kip

Rachel de Trieux”

Maria de Foreest married, first, in 1687 Bernard Darby, a mariner, from London. Second, Alderman Isaac de Riemer, in 1706, a son of Peter de Reimer. (See Rikers Revised Harlem.)
Page 113
33 – XIII Vol 7 p 131 (350)

“den 7 Sept Ao 1669

Isaac de Foreest

Sara Dutrieux

David Johannes van Brugge

Susanna de Foreest

David de Foreest, became a glazier; he removed to Stratford, Conn; and in 1696, married Martha Blagge (?) He died in April 1721, aged 52 years. (See Rikers Revised Harlem.)

Isaac de Foreest made his will as per “Calendar of Wills” of New York, page 97, on the 4th day of June 1672, which is noted as follows:

“Isaac de Forest, of New York City, a brewer, and wife Sarah de Truix. The survivor, daughters Susanna, wife of Pieter Riemer, Maria, sons Johannes, Philipp, Isaac, Hendricus and David. Real and Personal property. Executors and guardians cousin Jacob Kip and Arent Isaacsen. Original copy signed by tesators, witnesses and notary. No proofs.” (For additional information see de Forest Gen.)

Source:

Truax, T. de T., House of Truax. “Bien faire et ne rien craindre.” Historical Genealogy of the Truax-Truex Families of the United States and Canada, descendants of Philippe de Trieux, the first Huguenot-Knickerbocker of that name who settled in New Netherland in 16__ and embracing his posterity to the present date a period of nearly three centuries of Twelve Generations. Manuscript. From New York Public Library, Call No. NYGB Coll-94 Box 1 and Box 2.http://catalog.nypl.org/record=b18209329~S1 . (Accessed 18Jul2015)

[An interesting history of this manuscript can be found at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~truax/TheHouseofTruax.html]

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House of Truax – “First” Generation – Maria

Part I – House of Truax – Etymology
Part II – House of Truax – Historical
Part III – House of Truax – Church records
Part IV – House of Truax – New Amsterdam records
Part V – House of Truax – First Generation
Part VI – House of Truax – Truax Genealogy (Land Records)
Part VI – House of Truax – “First” Generation – Maria – below

Let’s try to finish the “First Generation” tonight. I am intrigued by the mention of my ancestor Maria – it says here she was perhaps an older sister of Philippe, but this is later corrected – hang tight. (SPOILER: She turns out to be second generation.)

Page 100

First Generation

Maria du Trieux (Peek), perhaps an elder sister of Philippe, was the widow of Cornelius Volkertse when she married Jan Peek in New Amsterdam, on the 20th of February 1640. In 1664 she was called “one of the oldest inhabitants of New Amsterdam[“]; as per Prof. Pearson, who further says:
“Jan (Peek), an early settler of New Amsterdam, where for many years he and his wife kept an inn. Frequent prosecutions were instituted against them for selling spirits without license, and for selling to the Indians. In 1655 he sold two houses in Fort Orange (Albany) to Johannes Dyckman for 1627 guilders. The creek at Peekskill takes its name from him.”

“Maria Peek, wife of Jan, late in life resided in Schenectady, perhaps with her son Jacobus.”

They had issue as per the “N. Y. Gen. and Biog. Records of the Reformed Dutch ch. Of N. Y.”

Ouders Kinders Getuygen
Vol 5 p 28 (250)I. “den 27 May Ao 1640

Maria du Trieux

Aernoudt Isaac de Foreest

Teunis Cray, Schipper

Jan Cant”

Page 101

Ouders Kinders Getuygen
Vol 5. P 97 (280)II “den 15 Octob. Ao 1651

Jan Peeck

Anna Isaac de Foreest

Aert Willemszen

Rebeca du Trieux

Wyntie Aerts”

Vol. 5. P 150 (287)III “den 12 Oct Ao 1653

Johannes Peeck

Johannes Thomas Hall

Claes Hendrickszen

Willem Pieterszen

Engeltie Jans

Susanna du Trieux”

Vol 5 p 175 (294)IV “den 16 Jan. Ao 1656

Jan Peeck

Maria de Terwick

Jacobus Frederick Lubbertszen

Simon de Groot

Tepje Willems”

Vol 5 p 182 (302)“den 6 Mart Ao 1658

Jan Peeck

Maria Hendrick van Bommel

eÿn huÿs vr.

Cornelius Pluvier

en huÿs vr.”

Page 102

  1. Nov. 9. “Maria de Truwe def’t in action. On the petition of Mary de Truy ordered:- Petitioner is referred to Govert Loockermans and Isaack de Foreest, guardians of the minor children. Signed “Mary de Truwe, wife of Jan Peeck.” (See records of “New Amsterdam” Vol I, p 261. Also for other matters, see pp. 265, 268, 270 and 272. Ibid, Vol III, pp 168 and 409. Ibid, Vol IV, p 343 and Vol II p 184).
  1. Thursday Nov 8. One Mary de Truy, widow, requests the appointment if Isaack de Foreest and Govert Loockermans as guardians of her minor children. Estate also has a mortgage on house of Andries Joghims. (See “N. Y. Year Book of the Holland Society,” 190_, p 121, from “Minutes of Orphans Court” in City Clerks office of N. Y. City).

Source:

Truax, T. de T., House of Truax. “Bien faire et ne rien craindre.” Historical Genealogy of the Truax-Truex Families of the United States and Canada, descendants of Philippe de Trieux, the first Huguenot-Knickerbocker of that name who settled in New Netherland in 16__ and embracing his posterity to the present date a period of nearly three centuries of Twelve Generations. Manuscript. From New York Public Library, Call No. NYGB Coll-94 Box 1 and Box 2.http://catalog.nypl.org/record=b18209329~S1 . (Accessed 18Jul2015)

[An interesting history of this manuscript can be found athttp://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~truax/TheHouseofTruax.html]

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House of Truax – Truax Genealogy (Land records)

Part I – House of Truax – Etymology

Part II – House of Truax – Historical

Part III – House of Truax – Church records

Part IV – New Amsterdam records

Part V – House of Truax – First Generation 

Part VI – House of Truax – Truax Genealogy (Land Records) – below

 

I progress onward – during the iteration of the First Generation, there was a brief break to insert some land records involving Philippe. I copy them here, before I do the last three pages labeled First Generation.

It is disheartening to see incorrect information being repeated about Philippe… when asked about sources, they do the online equivalent of shrugging, as if it doesn’t matter. Please always check sources!

On a lighter note, it was thrilling to find one of my ancestors, Philippe du Trieux, having dealings with another ancestor, Nicholas Stilwell, in 1649! It is not until ca 1880 that their descendants marry to become my ancestors.

On to the transcription…

Page 93

Truax Genealogy (Land records)

The following signature is a fac-simile of the autograph of Philippe du Trieux, which was attached to a legal document recorded in “Dutch Manuscripts,” Vol. II, p 27, in the archives of the Secretary of State Dep’t at Albany, N. Y., bearing date the 7th of October 1633.

IMG_1543

Through the kindness of Dr. O’Callahan, author of the “History of New Netherland”, and other documentary volumes, the editor was permitted, in the year of 1866, to make several tracings of the above signature.

During the early settlement of that section of New York City now (1906) known as Peck Slip, then lying within the stockades, extending south of the modern Frankfort street to Franklin Square, “lang de Wall”, (along the stone wall, now Wall Street), the original and only “straat” (street), there was  established a smithery which gave rise to the Dutch name “Smit’s Vly” (Smith’s Valley), in which section Philippe du Trieux became a land holder, as per copy of deed following/

In “Dutch Manuscripts,” Patent G. G. page 34, appears the following deed describing the said property.

“1640. May 22d – We William Kieft, Director Gen’l, and Councellors in behalf of the High and Mighty Lords, the States Gen’l of the United Netherlands and His Highness, the Prince of Orange, and their Excellencies, the managers of the Incorporated West Indies Company in New Netherlands residing, by these presents do publish and declare, that we on this day underwritten here, granted and bestowed upon Philippe du

Page 95 [there is no 94]

Truy, Court messenger Gereghts-bode a certain piece of land lying on the Island of Manhattan near Smith’s Valley where Cornelius van Tienhoven, the Secretary is situated, West South West: and David Provost, East North East, next to his district in the breath of the land of said Tienhoven, to Besevaers Kripple bus [?] 40 rods, of 12 feet to the rod, West South West, and East North East and in its length from the Beach 68 rods North by West and Southerly North to the land of the said Provost, extending in breadth along the Beach from Smith’s Valley to the fence of Davidt Provoost, and 78 rods, with the express condition and terms, that the said Philippe de Truy or his successors, their excellencies, shall acknowledge their Honors, the Directors aforesaid, as his Lords and Patrons under the Sovereignity of the High and Mighty Lords the States Gen’l, and to their Director and Council here, be in subjection in all things as good citizens are bound to be.

[emphasis mine]

Provided moreover, that the said Philippe shall further submit to all such taxes and imposts as by their Honor already had been enacted, or hereafter may be enacted, constituting over such the before named Philippe de Tray or his successors in the real or actual possession thereof, giving unto him full and irrevocable power and special permission to the said parcel of land, to enter, cultivate inhabit and

Page 96

Use in like manner has he might do with his other patrimonial lands and effects, without our, the grantors any longer therein having, reserving, or saving any part, action or control, but to this behoof as aforesaid. From all desisting and from this time forth and forever abstaining and renouncing by these presents all ownership to the said piece of land. Promising moreover this transport firmly, inviolably, irrevocably to maintain, fulfil and execute all under bond as by law thereto provided.

These presents are without fraud or deceit by us signed and confirmed with our seal.

Done at Fort Amsterdam in New Netherland on the 22nd, day of May A. D. 1640, New Style, and was undersigned William Kieft on the outside of the parchment below stood.

By order of the Honorable, the Director and Council in New Netherland.

(Signed) Cornelius van Tien Hoven, Sec’y.”

[Crossed out – 1644, 5th July (See insert here).]

[Crossed out – 1645 – 8th March – mentions a trial of an Indian accused of burning the residence of Jochem Peterson.]

Page 99?

1649 – 8th February. “Before me Cornelius van Tienhoven, Secretary of New Netherland (says “O’Callahans History of New Netherland”) appeared Henry Bresser, who acknowledged that he hath taken off the hands of Nicholas Stilewell, the land and dwelling house of Philippe de Truy, on one and the same condition as Stilewell hath agreed to with said Philippe; promising to fulfill the condition made by Stilewell with Philippe de Truy in all its parts, so that Philippe shall consider him, Henry Bresser, as principal in regard to said contract: provided, that Stilwell shall deliver in March, to Harry Breser, so many palisades as are required in front of the road, unto and from the land of William Goulder, and in the next month of March A. D., 1651 fence anew the other three parts, which palisades Stillewell must deliver in his presence on the strand near Mr. Allerious’s.”

Done this 8th February A. D. 1649.

This “f” is the mark of Henry Bresser, made by himself.

This “N” is the mark of Nicoles Stillewell to my knowledge.

Cor: van Tienhoven, Sec’y.”

Source:

Truax, T. de T., House of Truax. “Bien faire et ne rien craindre.” Historical Genealogy of the Truax-Truex Families of the United States and Canada, descendants of Philippe de Trieux, the first Huguenot-Knickerbocker of that name who settled in New Netherland in 16__ and embracing his posterity to the present date a period of nearly three centuries of Twelve Generations. Manuscript. From New York Public Library, Call No. NYGB Coll-94 Box 1 and Box 2. http://catalog.nypl.org/record=b18209329~S1 . (Accessed 18Jul2015)

[An interesting history of this manuscript can be found at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~truax/TheHouseofTruax.html ]

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House of Truax – First Generation

Part I – House of Truax – Etymology

Part II – House of Truax – Historical

Part III – House of Truax – Church records

Part IV – New Amsterdam records

Part V – House of Truax – First Generation – below

It is easy to sit here in my chair and critique the errors in the below. However, one must keep in mind that we bear the benefits of others’ painstaking research and groundbreaking findings, without which we would also be starting from scratch. This is a very early version of the first generation and should not be treated as all fact, but as a historical snapshot of all the research that has gone into our people.

Next is some court records, and then he picks up with some more work he calls first generation, before he goes to the second.

Happy Hunting!

Page 89

First Generation

1 – Philippe du Trieux, together with his wife Susanna Chiney or de Scheene as it is universally written, doubtless, were passengers on the ship New Netherland which arrived in the waters of (now) New York Bay during the month of May 1623, and was one of the first settlers of Huguenot-Knickerbocker distinction known to historians of ancient New York.

Where or when the marriage occurred is a matter of conjecture [blogger’s note: that marriage has been found]. It may have been in a little hamlet in the north eastern part of France known as Chiney, where Susanna may have been born; or it may have been in Norwich or Canterbury, England, where the surname of de Trie, Destrie, etc; appears on the church records, and where, perhaps they, with other Huguenot refugees found a temporary asylum from the French Inquisition.

Earley [sic] in the 17th century one Philippe du Trieu and Jacqueline Noriet, his wife, were residents of Amsterdam, Holland, where the church register contains the baptism of their son Philippe on the 3rd of January 1616. The names of the same parties, presumably, appears as members of the church at Leyden in October 1617, by letter from Amsterdam. Again, on the 10th of February 1619 they had another son

Page 90

Philippe baptised at Amsterdam on the 9th of February 1620; the former son evidently having not survived. They also had a daughter Madeleine subsequently baptised at Amsterdam. Nothing further respecting this Phillipe or his wife Jacqueline has been discovered from record either in Europe or New Netherland, except the unsupported statement of de Forest to the contrary. Yet the fact remains that their issue, or those bearing the same names were subsequent residents of New Amsterdam; for, (see later), one Madalentie de Terneu was sponsor at the baptism of a child of her sister (?) Jacomina de Terreu.

The christian name, Philippe, seems to have been quite common in different Dreux, du Trieu families, even as far back as the year 1217 when Louis (Dreux) VI, King of France, had a son Philippe; while, during the early part of the 16th and 17th centuries the name is found in Canterbury and Norwich England besides different parts of Holland. It might have been possible that Philippe du Trieux who married Jacqueline Noiret was a nephew or a cousin of Philippe, it is absolute certain he could not have been – as claimed by some of the editors correspondents – a son of Philippe, else it would be

Page 91

a flagrant libel upon church records – which are absolute – as well as a most ridiculous supposition; for in such an event, Philippe would have been a grandfather at the age of about 29 years.

No more could it be possible in the presence of existing facts – as many seem to think – that Philippe married Jacqueline Noriet, and later Susanna de Scheene, or viceversa. The church records at Amsterdam, Holland, gives the years from 1616 to 1620 wherein the children of Philippe du Trieux and his wife Jacqueline Noiret were baptised; while the records at Leyden, Holland (see [illegible] from Justice Charles H. Truax, preceding), show that Philippe du Trieux and his wife Susanna de Scheene emigrated from Norwich, England on the 22nd of April 1601. Also, on the same date of their arrival from Norwich, arrived one “Jacquemine, widow of Philippe du Trieux; doubtless, the widowed mother of Philippe, our progenitor. Other data of marriages of the issue of Philippe here recorded tends to show that at least three of their issue were born in Europe prior to the year 1620.

Page 92

It is unfortunate that all records of both births and marriage in New Amsterdam prior to the year 1639 have disappeared; hence, one must needs be governed for chronological data by attending circumstances. But the undisputed fact remains that Philippe and Susanna de Sheene were acknowledged man and wife, both in Europe and New Netherland, and were, as well, parents of [blogger’s note: this is incorrect; it has been conclusively established that the second theory is correct, that Philippe m1 Jacquemyne Noiret and m2 Susanna du Chesne. In his marriage to Susanna he is specified as Jacquemyne’s widower.  I do not know why Truax, or more likely his editor who I believe to be Howard S. F. Randolph, are so insistent that Susanna immigrated to the Netherlands with Philippe. Please, someone, enlighten me to these records!]

The following issue

2 – I, Jerome, born at Leyden. (Nothing further known of him).

3 – II, Philippe, perhaps born at Norwich. [blogger’s note: I believe b. Amsterdam, and there were previously acknowledged to be two Philippes]

4 – III, Rachel, born at Amsterdam, as per text of her marriage.

5 – IV, Sara, born at New Netherland, as per text of her marriage.

6 – V, Susanna, born at New Netherland, as per text of her marriage.

7 – VI, Abraham

8 – VII, Rebecca

[Blogger’s note: My own ancestor Maria should be added here, b. Amsterdam. Also Madeleine, and Isaac and Jacob.]

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Source:

Truax, T. de T., House of Truax. “Bien faire et ne rien craindre.” Historical Genealogy of the Truax-Truex Families of the United States and Canada, descendants of Philippe de Trieux, the first Huguenot-Knickerbocker of that name who settled in New Netherland in 16__ and embracing his posterity to the present date a period of nearly three centuries of Twelve Generations. Manuscript. From New York Public Library, Call No. NYGB Coll-94 Box 1 and Box 2. http://catalog.nypl.org/record=b18209329~S1 . (Accessed 18Jul2015)

[An interesting history of this manuscript can be found at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~truax/TheHouseofTruax.html ]

House of Truax – New Amsterdam records

Part I – House of Truax – Etymology

Part II – House of Truax – Historical

Part III – House of Truax – Church records

Part IV – New Amsterdam records – below

My work transcribing (parts of) the manuscript of House of Truax continues. This entry contains notes of various court records in New Amsterdam mentioning Philippe. These are the only known way of tracing our ancestor in the New World, so these slivers are quite valuable.

A question was asked about why Truax describes Philippe as a “Huguenot-Knickerbocker” – good question. I welcome comments and discussion on this!

Now, on to the transcription…

New Amsterdam records

Page ?

His [blogger’s note: I cut off part of the page, but this is certainly talking about Director Willem Kieft, who was governor from 1638-1647] first step on his assumption of the reins of government was to organize a council of which he should retain the entire control,” and, among other appointees mention is made of Philippe de Truy as “Courts messenger.” His duties consisted of serving summons, making arrests levying executions, ec., and were similar to those of a Marshall or a Constable of the present day.

The court proceedings in “Council Minutes of N. Y.,” on p 65, contains the following:-

1638 Sept. 2. “Symon Dircksen Pos vs. Philip de Truy, action of debt; claim cancelled on defendant delivering to the plaintiff all the fish in his house.”

1638 – 4th October. In “Valentines Manuel” of 1863, page 596 appears the following:-

“Philippe de Truy, the messenger, appeared and made solemn declaration that he went on the order of Rev. Bogardus, to the house of Anthony Jansen of Salee to beseech him to pay the money for which he was delinquent, and that said Anthony said in answer, if the minister requires the payment of the money at once, then I will rather lose my head than pay him, and if he insists on this course of procuring his money, it may yet cause an effusion of blood.”

Page 44

In the “Calendar of N. Y. Hist. Mss. Dutch 1630-1631 [?] appears the following:-

“1639 Mar. 30. P. 6 Declaration. Thomas Sanderson as to words between the wife of Anthony Jansen and Philip de Truy.”

“1639 Aug. 15. P. 10. Declaration. Philip de Truy, Peter van der Linde, and Jan Hendricksen, that Edward Wilson had kicked the wife of Truy’s gardner.”

1639 August 15th. “Philippe de Truy was 52 years old.” (“Albany Records”, p. 150)

(Note) Both of the historians, “Riker” and “Pearson”, gives the year 1585 as the date of the birth of Philippe. The above record makes his birth approx.[?] in the year 1586-7.

1640 Dec. 14. P 15. “Declaration. Philip de Truy, Juriaen Rodolff and Hans Schreuder, as to the testamentary disposition of his effects, made by Juriaen Gerles.”

1641 Oct. 15. P 17 “Receipt of Peter Andriessen for a milck cow from Philip de Truy on shares.”

1649 July 23. P 47. “Power of attorney. Cornelis Segersen of Rensselaerwyck, to Philip de Truy, to collect a debt of Jacobusoan Curler.”

Page ???

1645 – 29th August. “O’Callahan’s History of New Netherlands,” contains the following on page 258 of Vol. I.

“Philippe de Truy, the court messenger, was ordered to invite the citizens to assemble in the Fort on the next day, at the hoisting of the color and the ringing of the bell, to hear the articles of the proposed treaty of peace read, when they were assured that if any one could give good advice, he might then declare his opinion freely.

After all were assembled, having religiously smoked the great calumet (Indian pipe of peace), they concluded in the presence of the sun and of the ocean, a solemn and durable peace with the Dutch, and both contracting parties reciprocally bound themselves honorably and firmly to maintain and observe.”

Source

Truax, T. de T., House of Truax. “Bien faire et ne rien craindre.” Historical Genealogy of the Truax-Truex Families of the United States and Canada, descendants of Philippe de Trieux, the first Huguenot-Knickerbocker of that name who settled in New Netherland in 16__ and embracing his posterity to the present date a period of nearly three centuries of Twelve Generations. Manuscript. From New York Public Library, Call No. NYGB Coll-94 Box 1 and Box 2.http://catalog.nypl.org/record=b18209329~S1 . (Accessed 18Jul2015)

[An interesting history of this manuscript can be found athttp://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~truax/TheHouseofTruax.html]

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